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72-Hour Kit Challenge

January 23, 2013

Welcome back to our Big Girl 72-Hour Kit Challenge!

Last week we challenged you to plan out your 72-Hour Food Kits.  These are the kits we all should have neatly stored away for the first three days of an emergency.  If you have been following along with Daja and me, we have spent the last year increasing our food stores through freezing extra meals, buying in bulk and putting up foods by canning.  These are all great, and perfect for the unexpected job loss, illness or food shortage, but what if you suddenly had an earthquake and your house was no longer stable, or God-forbid there was another attack on American soil but this time in your city and you had to evacuate immediately?  This is when these little kits would be absolutely priceless!  We want to be like the sons of Isachaar who were credited as men who understood the  signs of the times and knew what to do.  (1 Chronicles 12:32)  Simply, we want to be prepared for anything.

As we researched ideas for these kits most everyone, suggested highly processed foods.  If you have spent any time on this blog you know we do not promote industrial processed foods of any kind.  We feel very strongly about eating whole foods, handled well.  We believe in nourishing our bodies.  As we planned these kits we couldn’t go against our core values!  Even in an emergency situation we have to eat as closely to the way we eat on daily basis as we can.  Our families will need all the comfort we can give them and strange food will not do!

The following are two separate approaches to this challenge.  Daja, with her soon-to-be family of 10, is the model of efficiency and simplicity.  She really had to take into account the storage space required for all the food she needs.  She has planned to package all the food together in one place instead of in individual kits.  For my family of four, I’ve planned a bit more variety and plan on storing the food in family-sized meal kits, so I can just grab a bag and go.

Daja’s 72-Hour Kit

Breakfasts:
Granola or Protein Bars: 30-count (10 people x 3 days)
Shelf-stable Organic Almond Milk: 6-32oz. containers (two boxes for each day)
Instant Coffee
Lunches:
Canned Fruit: 6 large cans (2 for each day)
Peanut Butter-3 jars, Jam-3 jars and Crackers-6 boxes: (two boxes of crackers each day, one jar of PB each day and one jar of jam each day)
Dinners:
Canned Tuna: 9 cans (three for each day)
Noodles: 6 bags (two for each day)
Salt-n-pepper

Canned Vegetables 9 cans (three for each day)

Extras: Tea Bags, Trail Mix, Beef Jerky, an extra 1.2 liter Bottle of Water per person.   (We store large containers of drinking water, so the extra bottle per person is just for that initial time.)

For the dog: Six cans dog food (two for each day.  I think I can store canned food for the dog cheaper, longer and with less space requirements than a bag of dry food.

Kristina’s 72-Hour Kit

72-hour food kit

Now that we’ve got the hard part of planning out of the way, we’ll be working on purchasing the items we need and working out exactly where all of this will be stored.  Once we get everything together we’ll post our pictures for you in February.  In the mean time, let us know how your plans are coming along!!  (Completed kits can be be seen here.)

(Linked to Little Natural Cottage and Home Acre Hop)
8 Comments leave one →
  1. Andrea permalink
    January 23, 2013 12:04 pm

    Love this!!! For four or for ten, it can be done! And both your lists make it look very do-able for all.

    An added idea (for those who it might apply to): we used to get home delivery of our water & it used to come in 5-gallon containers. At any given time, we used to have anywhere from 4-6 of these 5-gallon containers of water available. Seeing those always gave me a sense of a little bit of security when I’d walk by them… knowing that we had enough water “if”. We cancelled that delivery service quite some time ago, due to cost-cutting in our budget, but maybe we should start it up again. Our tap water is not drinkable so getting the containers without being already filled, and filling them ourselves, wouldn’t be an option. I had a Berkey water filter thingy but the filters got full of yuck so fast (it’s calcium & lime, primarily) that it was financially counter-productive to use it.

    My main problem now is my prescription hypertension medications. Without them I’d be sunk! But the pharmacy will only dispense a 30-day supply at a time and won’t refill my prescription unless I’m down to so many pills left (less than a week). I can get my prescriptions via mail-order through my husband’s insurance but they will only dispense generic… and I don’t take generic…. I must use brand-name. Plus, I like having my own pharmacist here in town, who knows me & I know him. I asked if I could purchase a 2-3 months’ supply (my prescription is for 6 months) but they said I couldn’t…. since I have an insurance company associated with my account, they MUST run the prescription through the insurance first… and it’s insurance that is keeping me from buying more than a 30-day supply at a time… even though they hardly cover anything for brand-name so we pay the bulk of the $$ anyway. 😦

    Anyway, that’s my current dilemma re: preparedness. I would have enough of my prescriptions for 72-hours, most definitely, but not for longer if I needed it. A little discouraging.

    Oh… I would add sanitary napkins for our youngest daughter, in our To Go Bag. While our Caboose was in Chicago the initial time, after her cerebral hemorrhage, she started her menstrual cycle while in ICU. It was not nearly time yet so I was surprised. The nurses all told us that almost every girl in ICU starts her period at some point during her stay. It’s the trauma & stress to the body, of whatever kind, that causes the menses to start “out of nowhere”. So perhaps the trauma & stress of a catastrophic event, that would cause folks to leave their homes for 3 days or more, might also cause the girls & women to have a need for sanitary napkins. It would be nice to be able to reach for them in the To Go Bag too.

    If pregnant, perhaps some anti-labor herbs would be handy to have too, if a pregnant woman like Daja is open to taking something like that…. perhaps in tea form. I don’t know but if trauma & stress can cause a menstrual cycle to crop up at a totally inappropriate time, maybe labor could do the same thing.

    Love & blessings– Andrea
    XOXOXO

    • January 24, 2013 6:20 am

      I was thinking about getting my thyroid medicine from my friend who mother is a doctor in Canada. You might have to buy your meds in Mexico or Canada.

    • Kay permalink
      July 11, 2013 4:19 am

      Hi Andrea,
      I’m not sure whether you’ll get this long after the fact, but here’s a thought on your hypertension medicine dilemma. Find out how soon the insurance company allows you to refill your prescription (mine allows when there is 25% remaining, i.e., about a week). Whether it’s a week early, or five days, or even something ridiculously short like three, the next time you refill, immediately take out that week’s worth (or 5 day’s worth, or what have you) of pills and put them in a separate container. In ~three weeks you’ll have to refill again without having to remember to do so early. Continue doing this for several months. If, for example, you’re allowed to refill a week in advance, by the end of four months, you’ll have an “extra” month stashed away for your emergency kit. Rotate the extra stash every 6 months or year so the medication doesn’t expire.

  2. February 18, 2013 3:37 pm

    Great challenge! Love it! Thanks so much for sharing on The HomeAcre Hop! Hope to see you next time at:
    http://www.theselfsufficienthomeacre.com/2013/02/the-homeacre-hop-7.html

Trackbacks

  1. What I Loved In January (Plus, Our Exciting Announcement At The Bottom!) | Cheeky Bums Blog
  2. February Goals « The Provision Room
  3. 72-Hour Food Kits Revealed « The Provision Room
  4. Answering Your Questions: Preparedness | The Provision Room

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